Posts Tagged ‘recover’


LOL! I am not doing Fran today because that is def not a active rest day wod but when I saw that it made me laugh so I thought I would share. That would be a rest day fail for sure.

Today’s WOD (Active Rest Day)

Run 1 mile
50 Double Unders (200 Singles)
Run 800 M
50 Double Unders (200 Singles)
400m Run
50 Double Unders (200 Singles)


Yup! That about sum’s it up for me today. I’m on day two of resting my back from 14.3. I didn’t hurt it per say but I did make it mad so I’m doing my best to get it back on my side and happy with me again. So that might mean even another rest day tomorrow. Siggghhh. My Bella bar and weights came from Rouge yesterday and all I want to do is rip in to the boxes and use my new bar! I have a new wall ball that will be here any day and I want to do Karen as soon as it get’s here. I want to run (well wait, I don’t want to run but I need to run) I want to work on my pullups my purple band came today and I’m so close to unassisted pullups! Sighhhh So much I want to do and all I can do is sit here with it all going though my mind and then new things popping up also! And then of course I have 14.4 that will be here before I know it.

How do y’all fee about rest days and how do you program them into your workout week? I know they are important and we always take them but I try not to take them in a row for this reason. I feel like I will go crazy. lol



Happy Tuesday everyone!!!! Here’s my last couple wod’s. Hard to keep up while I’m in Orlando but we are heading back to SC today so it will be easier and I will have more time on here! Saturdays wod was a good one! I was really happy with all the wods this week lots of barbell work and I needed that. I also got my double unders, snatched more than I ever had before. So overall it was a good week.

Saturdays’s WOD


I can not remember what my time was with this one but I did push hard to finish. I did my first Round at 35lbs, 2nd at 55, 3erd 60lbs and 4th at 65lbs.

Sunday was my Sunday Fun day Rest day.





Monday’s WOD

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I got less then I did friday. I completed 3 full rounds. Friday I did 3 plus 24. But in my defence I was practicing double unders all weekend and my legs were shot by Monday! I get getting whipped by the rope!

Tuesdays WOD


I did this one in 30:31 I was really happy with my time! I did 14/65 I love wall balls! I know that’s Odd to hear but I practiced them so much before the garage games that I got pretty good at them. Now when you add those cleans into it its a whole different situation! LOL It killed me! If you add it up its 150 wallballs and 150 cleans. And then 100 abmatt situps to end with.

Now that I’m home I should be able to keep up with this much better!!! I’m taking today and tomorrow off and will be back at it again Friday!!!

Okay so the Garage games are in 4 days! Here are the wod’s and the standards. My arm is I would say almost healed. Enough that I will be fine Saturday. I feel like I could have trained harder the last 2 week’s if my arm didn’t decided it wanted to get shingles but it is what it is. We did our final run through of the Wod’s yesterday and today officially starts our rest days!!! I can not remember the last time we have had 3 whole days off in a row!!! Its crazy! We have 90 minute massages booked for Thursday in our house! So no stress of finding a babysitter and the guy we found had a million AMAZING reviews so fingers crossed he is that good. And he has experience with crossfitters so hopefully he can fix our bodies as much as possible in a 90 minute time span. We have been eating so healthy, Cut out wine and beer and have been getting lots of sleep. Or as much as Bryden will let us get 😉 So hopefully we will be ready!!! So Wish us luck and The next blog will be about how we did at the games!!!! WOOOOOOP WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOP! Oh and any advise from anyone who has competed before is VERY welcome!!!





PS- The flag was flipped the right way the next day. We didn’t realize we had it the wrong way and out of 5 different military ppl who looked at our pics and our gym no one noticed 😦 We felt really bad.


Morning all amazinggg my blog followers!:) Hope y’all are having a great week! With the weekend looming in the very neer future I have to start my meal planing and grocery list for my once a week trip. One thing I’m determined to get on top of before I go is yogurt! Its soo weird normally I’m very into knowing what everything is I buy, whats in it, health benefits or even if it’s just down right not healthy. Yogurt is one thing I have not really researched. I think it’s because I’ve never really liked it but I know its something I should try to eat everyday. It’s normally my afternoon snack. Now my question is what one’s are really good for you and which ones are not? Yesterday my husband noticed that the one I was eating had artificial sweetener in it. It was a pretty major “Fail” moment for me. I try not to eat any artificial sweetener. It was one of the last things on the ingredients list so it didn’t have allot but still its prompted me to research this topic! SOO on to what I found!

The Dirt on Yogurt

Yogurt can be a low-cal way to get protein and calcium, but choose the wrong kind, and you could eat a container with nutritional content similar to that of ice cream.

Pick low-fat varieties, with at least 6 grams of protein. Greek yogurt have more protein per serving than plain yogurt, but full-fat Greek yogurt can contain up to 18 grams of saturated fat.

Also check for sugar. “Oftentimes sugar is off the charts in yogurt,” Gans says. Aim for less than 20 grams of sugar per serving. Choose a version that has lower sugar, between 6 and 12 grams, like plain yogurt, then add your own sweet fruits.

The good news is yogurt is low in sodium.

Greek Yogurt Vs. Regular Yogurt: Which Is More Healthful?

First, to be clear: Both Greek and regular yogurt, in their plain, nonfat or low-fat forms, can be part of a healthful diet. They’re low in calories and packed with calcium and live bacterial cultures. But our Mediterranean friend—which is strained extensively to remove much of the liquid whey, lactose, and sugar, giving it its thick consistency—does have an undeniable edge. In roughly the same amount of calories, it can pack up to double the protein, while cutting sugar content by half. Those are “two things dietitians love,” says Dawn Jackson Blatner, a registered dietitian and author of The Flexitarian Diet. “For someone who wants the creamier texture, a little bit of a protein edge, and a sugar decrease, going Greek is definitely not all hype.” And it’s really got a following: In the past five years, Greek yogurt sales nationwide have skyrocketed, likely because it satisfies consumers’ needs for health, convenience, and taste, according to Nielsen, a global marketing and advertising research company.

Protein. Greek yogurt is high in protein, which helps promote fullness. A typical 6-ounce serving contains 15 to 20 grams, the amount in 2 to 3 ounces of lean meat. That makes it particularly appealing to vegetarians, who sometimes struggle to get enough of the nutrient. An identical serving of regular yogurt, on the other hand, provides just 9 grams, meaning you may feel hunger pangs sooner.

Carbohydrates. Going Greek is a smart choice for low-carb dieters. It contains roughly half the carbs as the regular kind—5 to 8 grams per serving compared with 13 to 17. Plus, the straining process removes some of the milk sugar, lactose, making Greek yogurt less likely to upset the lactose-intolerant. Remember, however, that “both types of yogurt can contain high amounts of carbs if they’re sweetened with sugar or another sweetening agent,” says Kari Hartel, a Missouri-based registered dietitian. “No matter which type you choose, opt for yogurt with less added sugar.”

Fat. Be wary of Greek yogurt’s fat content. In just 7 ounces, Fage’s full-fat Greek yogurt packs 16 grams of saturated fat—or 80 percent of your total daily allowance if you’re on a 2,000-calorie diet. (That’s more than in three Snickers bars.) Dannon’s regular full-fat yogurt has 5 grams of saturated fat in an 8-ounce serving. Saturated fat raises total and “bad” LDL cholesterol levels, increasing the risk for heart disease. Read nutrition labels carefully. If you’re going Greek, stick to low-fat and fat-free versions.

Sodium. A serving of Greek yogurt averages 50 milligrams of sodium—about half the amount in most brands of the regular kind. (Low-sodium versions of regular yogurt are available.) Too much salt can boost blood pressure and increase the risk of other heart problems. The federal government’s 2010 Dietary Guidelines urge Americans to cap sodium at 2,300 milligrams a day, or 1,500 milligrams if they’re older than 50, African-American, or have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease.

Calcium. Regular yogurt provides 30 percent of the federal government’s recommended daily amount. Greek yogurt loses some of its calcium through the straining process, but still packs a wallop. A 6-ounce cup typically supplies about 20 percent of the daily recommendation. If you’re still worried about calcium intake, load up on milk, seeds, and almonds, says Sarah Krieger, a registered dietician and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association.

Okay so even after that. How do I chose the healthiest one?!? I already had picked a greek yogurt b/c of how much we workout I wanted the extra protein and I still failed. 😦

1. Keep it simpleTo make yogurt, all that’s needed is milk and two live bacterial cultures, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, which turn the milk into yogurt via fermentation. “Beyond that, a few added extras for flavor, like a little sugar or some fruit, are fine,” Kaufman says. Steer clear of products that have long lists of ingredients with things you can’t pronounce or wouldn’t expect to see in yogurt, like hydrogenated oils and artificial sweeteners.-

2. Look for good bugs-Probiotics—good bacteria similar to the ones living in your digestive tract—are yogurt’s key ingredient. These beneficial bugs have been shown to help with digestion and gut health. But surprisingly, not all yogurt sold in stores actually contains “live and active cultures,” as the bacteria in yogurt are known. Some companies heat-treat yogurt after culturing, which kills off bacteria, both good and bad, to make it more shelf-stable and reduce tartness.

3.Make calcium count-Yogurt is a stellar source of bone-building calcium, but the amount can vary from brand to brand. Aim for one that has at least 15 percent of the daily value for calcium; the yogurts on our list contain anywhere from 15 to 35 percent.

4. Do a sugar check-Trying to cut back on added sugar? Don’t rely only on the number of grams listed on the label. Yogurt has a fair amount of naturally occurring milk sugar, aka lactose (about 9 grams in a 6-ounce container of plain regular yogurt, and about 7 grams in Greek yogurt), and the sugar figure includes both natural and added sugars. Our shortcut: Avoid any product that lists sugar as the first or second ingredient.

5. Beware of fake fruit- Adding your own fresh fruit to plain yogurt is always a healthy choice. But sometimes you want the convenience of yogurt with fruit already added. Make sure you see actual fruit on the list of ingredients, ideally before any added sugars, Kaufman advises. “Otherwise it probably just contains a mix of sugar and food coloring or vegetable juice,” she say

6. Read labels carefully- Luckily, it’s easy to tell if your yogurt includes probiotics. The National Yogurt Association has created a Live & Active Cultures seal for products that contain significant amounts of L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus. (These two bacteria, in particular, must be used in order for a product to be called “yogurt,” per federal regulations. You might see additional cultures listed, but the research on their health benefits is still emerging; a yogurt that contains more cultures isn’t necessarily better for you.) Not every company chooses to carry the seal, so you can also look for “Live and Active Cultures” on the label or L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus in the ingredient list. If a product has been heat-treated after culturing, the company is required to say so on the label.

The winners for the top 3??

1. Stonyfield Farm Plain Organic Low Fat Yogurt

2. Plain 0% Fage Greek Yogurt

3. Chobani 0% Yogurt

A couple of the worst?

1. Yoplait Greek Yogurt (Yep that’s the one I was getting)

2. Honey flavor Dannon Greek Yogurt

Question of the day!!!

Do y’all have a favorite yogurt? Which one and why?

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Rest days are so important and I feel one of the hardest things to do! 😦 I posted awhile back about the importance of them but here is a nice reminder from the box magazine! I really need to subscribe to their magazine they always have great information!

What do y’all do for rest day’s??? I hoping to do some Hot Yoga later today and if not go for a long walk with the family! 🙂

For those addicted to the rigorous activity a CrossFit workout offers, a sense of boredom can become a rest-day damper. That feeling in the back of your head that you just can’t shake, like you’re missing out on something that will make you a better athlete and potentially improve your speed or strength or stamina. It’s enough to send some people into a panic. But truth be told, rest days are an imperative part of fitness. An athlete can only go so long before his body rebels in a dire attempt to recover. Varying the way in which you rest gives your body some time to recuperate while keeping your mind at ease. Here are my rest-day recommendations.

Consequences of not taking rest days.

Unless you’re an alien life form (or Rich Froning), your body needs a break. CrossFit’s structured beatings actually break down muscle in an attempt to build it back up, but if that rest period isn’t put into place, the breakdown begins to hinder development. Fatigue, strength losses and injury are all major concerns when an athlete is too active at an intense and demanding level. And overtraining will not only hinder your physical abilities but also have a detrimental effect on your mental state. Digressing is never an experience athletes embrace. When your body won’t operate up to your standards, the mind takes a toll as well. Frustration, irritability and lack of concentration rear their ugly heads in cases of physical and mental exhaustion. So do everybody a favor and take a day off.

When to take rest days.

Many trainers will suggest rest days be scheduled every 4th day. 3 days on, 1 day off, repeat. For folks with a little flexibility in their schedule, this is a fantastic option and ensures your body is allowed some relaxation. However, for those who have a set schedule that binds them to particular days and availability, 2 days rest per week is a respectable regimen. For personalities that prefer predictable structure, those days can be set. Perhaps every Thursday and Sunday you take a day off. Personally, I listen to my body. If I feel great, I’m going to workout. And if I’m feeling run down or extra sore, I might lay low for that day. Develop a rest strategy that works for you and your fitness goals, and as your athleticism progresses, adjust accordingly. Just be sure you recognize the messages your body sends you to avoid overdoing it.

How to spend rest days.
There is no right way to spend a rest day. If the couch is calling your name, pop in a couple movies, eat a bag of M&Ms and enjoy the lethargy. But to ease your tight muscles and maximize your recovery results, take a lightly active approach. I like to treat my rest days as a form of therapy for any aches, so I try to incorporate stretching, light cardio or maybe yoga. And to spice things up, it’s always fun to throw in some adventurous activities like hiking, swimming or a day of retail therapy with some speed-walking and light lifting at the mall. Another recommendation: sex. Get your heart rate up, work on some mobility and break a small sweat. Seems only fitting given the fact that CrossFit embraces constant variation. And after some rehab, back to business.

The addiction to your newfound fitness is inevitable. But exhibit some common sense and caution to maintain the health you so desire. Going overboard will do you more harm than good and will sabotage your mission for a stronger, faster, fitter you. Your body gives you everything it’s got in a workout, so return the favor and learn to embrace your rest days, regardless of when and how you spend them.

Abi Reiland
CrossFit 8035