The Truth about Crossfit Training goals

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“CrossFit is not a specialized fitness program, but a deliberate attempt to optimize physical competence in each of 10 recognized fitness domains,” says founder Greg Glassman in the Foundations document. Those domains are: cardiovascular and respiratory endurance, stamina, strength, flexibility, power, speed, coordination, agility, balance, and accuracy.

CrossFit coaches like to point out that even champions in certain sports have huge gaps in their fitness, as defined by the above 10 domains. Ironman competitors score high in some areas, low in others. The marathoner dominates cardio endurance but he isn’t strong. The powerlifter is strong, but often has very low endurance and can’t do a single pull-up.

If your goal is to specialize and compete in one sport, then CrossFit isn’t for you. Instead, the goal of the CrossFitter is to become “competent” in all 10 domains. He may never be a top gymnast but he will develop great body control. He may never win a marathon, but he can enter a 5K without training for it and finish near the top.

Troy Dodson, owner of CrossFit Plano, says that for the CrossFitter, fitness itself is the sport. Indeed, CrossFit draws a lot of ex-athletes, and the CrossFit Games are growing in popularity and pulling big-time sponsors. If it sticks, CrossFit competition will join a distinguished list of training methods that eventually became competitive sports, including Olympic lifting, powerlifting, and strongman.

The CF goal of overall fitness, “functional” strength, and all-around preparedness has attracted many law-enforcement agencies, military and firefighting units, and martial artists who like the “train for the unknown and unknowable” philosophy.

According to the CrossFit website, “Our specialty is not specializing. Combat, survival, many sports, and life reward this kind of fitness and, on average, punish the specialist.”

Experienced CrossFitters aren’t the strongest athletes out there, but they’re stronger than most. They’re not the fastest either, but they’re fast. Their claim to fame is their completeness.

And it’s easy to see the appeal: Why be big if you’re not functional? Why have great endurance if you have no strength and power? Why not be competent in all of those things?

Critics point out that being “competent” at everything makes you great at nothing. It’s a valid criticism, but it doesn’t bother the CrossFit community. They revel in their versatility and believe strongly that being skilled in every aspect of fitness makes them, as their T-shirts proclaim, “unfuckwithable.”

One important aspect of CrossFit is the Tabata method, a protocol that involves training the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems simultaneously, using short sets of all-out effort followed by even shorter rest periods. Dan is credited with introducing the Tabata method — first used in Japanese research, and later tested with elite athletes in a variety of sports — to regular gym rats looking for quick fat loss.

To read more I got this Information from- http://www.tnation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_investigative/the_truth_about_crossfit

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