Posts Tagged ‘food’

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So I have had a handful of people ask me how we eat. I typed this up for a friend but figured why not share it. Maybe it will be helpful for someone maybe not. But it doesn’t hurt to share right? 🙂 So this is basically how our day’s go.

We don’t do paleo or any other diet that you have to eat specific things. We like cheese, beer, wine, ice cream too much to do those. lol We try to stick to low to med glycemic foods (Mostly low but mediums are def. in the mix) and pretty much stay away from any high. There is a lot of information out there on glycemic index and I think it’s key to eating right. Here is a couple pages I found kinda fast but def look into the information. Its not a fad, or a diet its just basically eating healthy food that will help your body sustain energy. http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/glycemic-index-diet/art-20048478http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=faq&dbid=32

I eat egg whites scrambled with spinach almost every morning. I have nothing against the whole egg we just so many eggs I don’t want to overdo it b/c they are high in cholesterol. Sometimes I throw in some feta to. (I was eating cereal but I haven’t in 3 months now at all and I think that has made a difference plus I don’t even crave it anymore) That’s been my staple breakfast oh with toast. We buy Rudi’s Bread and its great full of what you need and none of what you don’t want. And its tasty! And so far we love all of it. We have tried the English muffins, wraps and most of the breads. http://foodbabe.com/2014/02/24/healthiest-bread-on-the-market/

We also started the whole butter in coffee thing also. One cup a day of it and nothing other than butter added. (Then I drink I’m sure way to much Black coffee after that. lol) http://nextshark.com/5-reasons-why-everyone-is-putting-butter-in-their-coffee/3a25003162b3c6d3ac03b72f775c7d01

I also just started making steal cut oats. They are one of the least processed oats and you can make a batch in the slow cooker and have them all week! I’m on my second week of doing it my son and husband love them. I did apple and cinnamon last week and blueberry and banana this week. I added more spices to both then it called for. It makes mornings easy and they have something healthy and yummy. http://www.hungryhealthygirl.com/2013/02/19/steel-cut-oatmeal-slow-cooker/http://thealmostvegan.com/slow-cooker-apple-cinnamon-steel-cut-oats/

I eat tuna fish alot for lunch and normally with a veggie or cottage cheese (I always get 2 percent I don’t like to get lower I want that extra fat from it. Same with milk or yogurts we never have less than 2 percent) I’m still trying to come up with new lunch ideas. Anyone has any good ideas let me know! I’m always open to new ideas!!

ee3cd37b0e314c3c71e0889ae6fa4f30A Chobani Greek Yogurt (We did alot of Ingredients reading b4 going with that one) A banana and some Kind granola (It’s the best for granola again we did alot of ingredients reading plus its yummy its also at the commissary for a better price but I’ve found more flavors in Super Target) is pretty much bri and I’s regular snack. We also always keep humus in the fridge and I always have pretzels, celery, or red peppers to dip in it. Raw carrots, grapes, apples to munch on to. We get LÄRABAR bars and buddy fruits for when we are on the go.

Dinner is alot of chicken, ground chicken burgers, turkey burgers (We def do more with ground chicken then turkey) Pork and sometimes beef. That’s more of a treat if we have steaks and sometimes burgers but really not too often. We eat alot of sweet potatoes we use them like we use to use regular potato’s butter sometimes some scream or a little cheese. We really use them in a lot of ways I can’t even remember the last time we got regular potatoes. We try to always do a veggie with dinner. Doesn’t always happen but we try. OH squash we cook a lot with it! I love spaghetti squash! You can sub it for spaghetti and it turns out so yummy! Oh and cauliflower Mash! I take head cut it up boil it till its soft drain it mash it (I use hand held blender) and add one small thing of cottage cheese salt and pepper and you have mash potatoes! 😀 I Love them!!!

I do a lot of searching for recipes that will not be super difficult, cost a ton of money but still yummy and healthy. Sometimes I get really frustrated with it. Lol But here’s a few that we have tried and liked. If you have any good ones send them this way please!

http://www.willcookforsmiles.com/2013/07/buffalo-chicken-burger.html
http://pinchofyum.com/healthy-jalapeno-sweet-potato-chicken-chili
http://www.smells-like-home.com/2013/06/cheddar-jalapeno-chicken-burgers-with-guacamole/
http://boxgrl81.com/recipes/quinoa-jambalaya/
http://boxgrl81.com/recipes/paleo-pork-chops-with-caramelized-onion-and-apple-sauce/
http://boxgrl81.com/recipes/paleo-kinda-stuffed-peppers/
http://www.smokedngrilled.com/grilled-cheesy-apple-pie-chicken-burger/
http://greenlitebites.com/2010/07/05/spinach-feta-turkey-burgers/

Okay snacks- We are like kids Bri and I both need a treat at the end of the day! We have ice cream, Or Pudding cups, or some sorta small yummy treat. It’s always small and portion controlled. With fall around the corner there will all sortsa pumpkin goodness in our house! When I do bake I try to always make lighter versions or Paleo treats. So far all the ones I have made have turned out pretty yummy!

Wine/Beer we limit to once a week sometimes depending on what’s going on 2 times a week but thats not very often. It was hard at first because I like my nightly glass of wine. But now its not a issue. It’s really weird. Even beer now I never really feel like it. I guess it was just getting over that hurdle. Sometimes its hard when other ppl don’t understand why you don’t want to drink but I’ve stuck to it and I know it was a good change. Plus I get more excited now about my wine! LOL I savor it!

I’m sure you know this but be careful of anything that says fat free or low fat. Read the ingredients because most of the time they sub the fat with something and its normally more sugar and stuff you do not want to put in your body.

We try to buy a very small amount of processed foods if possible. For tomato sauce we make our own. No Jar. Chicken Broth we make our own no box. (Both taste way better also) Seasoning for example taco seasoning we make our own that way we know what is in it. Pinterest is great for that kind of stuff also. Most of my shopping now is done in the produce area of the store or at a farmers market (Buying local is a great way to go! Support your local farms!)

We stopped drinking soda and drink a ton of water But I do crave the carbonated part and found that Dasani’s new sparkling water is really good and way cheaper than Perrier. So that’s pretty much always stocked in our fridge. Oh and chocolate milk.88499183ca69ab17b00035f1a66fdf23

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Okay what is the dish on these? To me? They looked like bird seed! I used them for the first time this morning making homemade popsicals. (Recipe coming soon as long as they turn out yummy!) Now I had no idea what health benefits that you got from them so I had to do some research and figure it out. It was pretty surprising how good these bird seed like seeds are for you! So here the information I found on them. If you haven’t used them I think it wouldn’t hurt to give them a try and if you have what are your favorite ways to use them?

Chia Seeds

Ch-ch-ch-chia! The fuzzy green novelty items may be the first thing you think of when you hear the word chia, but these tiny superfood seeds are the reason Chia Pets get their lush coating. Nowadays, chia is becoming better known as a great source of healthy omega-3 fats and fibre, and fortunately it’s an easy food to add to your diet.

Chia seeds come from a flowering plant in the mint family that’s native to Mexico and Guatemala, and history suggests it was a very important food crop for the Aztecs. It’s remained in regular use in its native countries, but was largely unknown in North America until researcher Wayne Coates began studying chia as an alternative crop for farmers in northern Argentina about 29 years ago.

Coates started his work on chia in 1991, and since then has become an advocate of the tiny seed’s health benefits. The human trials are limited —as is often the case with food research— but the anecdotal evidence of chia’s positive health effects include boosting energy, stabilizing blood sugar, aiding digestion, and lowering cholesterol.

The little seed — which comes in either white or a dark brown and black color — also has a huge nutritional profile. It contains calcium, manganese, and phosphorus, and is a great source of healthy omega-3 fats. As an added benefit, chia seeds can be eaten whole or milled, while flax seeds have to be ground before consumption in order to access their health benefits for example.

When you’re buying chia, both the white and black seeds are good choices, but Coates warns to make sure you’re getting a good quality product by avoiding either red seeds (immature chia seeds), or black seeds that are smaller than regular chia seeds (weed seeds). Coates sells the seeds himself, but they are available from many different health food stores and supermarkets.

So once you’ve got your seeds, how to you add them to your diet? “The easiest way is to add it to everything and anything,” Coates says. The seeds are tasteless so they won’t affect the flavour profile of your food, which makes them easy to integrate into your meals. They can be sprinkled whole on top of salads or toast or added milled to smoothies, and Coates says that some of his customers even add them to ice cream. (And yes, you can even sprout it and eat it that way too!)

10 reasons to add chia seeds to your diet:

Combat Diabetes
Chia is being studied as a potential natural treatment for type-2 diabetes because of its ability to slow down digestion. The gelatinous coating chia seeds develops when exposed to liquids-can also prevent blood sugar spikes.

Get More Fibre
Just a 28-gram or one-ounce serving of chia has 11 grams of dietary fibre — about a third of the recommended daily intake for adults. Adding some chia to your diet is an easy way to make sure you’re getting a good amount of fibre, which is important for digestive health.

Stock Up On Omega-3
Chia seeds are packed with omega-3 fatty acids, with nearly five grams in a one-ounce serving. These fats are important for brain health. “There’s better conversion of omega 3s into the plasma or into the food than with flax seed,” said researcher Wayne Coates.

Stronger Teeth And Bones
A serving of chia seeds has 18 per cent of the recommended daily intake for calcium, which puts your well on your way to maintaining bone and oral health, and preventing osteoporosis.

Don’t Forget Manganese
Manganese isn’t a well-known nutrient, but it’s important for our health: it’s good for your bones and helps your body use other essential nutrients like biotin and thiamin. One serving of chia seeds, or 28 grams, has 30 per cent of your recommended intake of this mineral.

Plenty Of Phosphorus
With 27 per cent of your daily value for phosphorus, chia seeds also helps you maintain healthy bones and teeth. Phosphorus is also used by the body to synthesize protein for cell and tissue growth and repair.

Pack In The Protein
Chia seeds also make a great source of protein for vegetarians and don’t have any cholesterol. One 28-gram serving of these super seeds has 4.4 grams of protein, nearly 10 per cent of the daily value.

Fight Belly Fat
Chia’s stabilizing effect on blood sugar also fights insulin resistance which can be tied to an increase in belly fat, according to Live Strong. This type of resistance can also be harmful for your overall health.

Get Full. Faster
Tryptophan, an amino acid found in turkey, is also found in chia seeds. While tryptophan is responsible for that strong urge to nap after a big Thanksgiving dinner for example, it also helps regulate appetite, sleep and improve mood.

Improve Heart Health
According to the Cleveland Clinic, chia seeds have been shown to improve blood pressure in diabetics, and may also increase healthy cholesterol while lowering total, LDL, and triglyceride cholesterol. All good news for your ticker!

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This information was found at http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/06/03/chia-seed-benefits-_n_3379831.html

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So my husband and I had leeks last night in our dinner. It was a Paleo stir fry basically with leeks, carrots, sausage and eggs on top and of course seasonings. When the leeks started cooking I did not like the smell at all. I’m not a fan of strong smells in the kitchen also it made me worry about the taste. Well when it was all said and done you really could not taste anything out of the ordinary so it really made my husband and I question the point of them being in the stir fry. If not for flavor did they have a really good health benefit? Well I had to look it up today and it just so happens that they do! They are really really healthy! I wish I would have known about them earlier. They are not to expensive and really easy to add to dishes without compromising flavor but adding health perks.

Health Benefits

Leeks, like garlic and onions, belong to a vegetable family called the Allium vegetables. Since leeks are related to garlic and onions, they contain many of the same beneficial compounds found in these well-researched, health-promoting vegetables.

Cardiovascular Support

Leeks contain important amounts of the flavonoid kaempferol, which has repeatedly been shown to help protect our blood vessel linings from damage, including damage by overly reactive oxygen molecules. Interestingly, one of the mechanisms involved in this blood vessel protection may involve increased production of nitric oxide (NO), a naturally occurring gas that helps to dilate and relax the blood vessels, as well as decreased production of that asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a substance that blocks production of NO.

Often overlooked in leeks is their important concentration of the B vitamin folate. Folate is present in leeks in one of its bioactive forms (5-methyltetrahydrofolate, or 5MTHF) and it is present throughout the plant (including the full leaf portion, not only the lower leaf and bulb). While it’s true that we still get about 50% more 5MTHF from the bulb than the leaves, this distribution of folate throughout the plant makes leeks a cardioprotective food from top to bottom. (Folate is a key B complex vitamin for supporting our cardiovascular system, because it helps keep our levels of homocysteine in proper balance. Excessively high levels of homocysteine are a risk factor for many cardiovascular diseases.)

Also present in leeks are impressive concentrations of antioxidant polyphenols. These polyphenols play a direct role in protecting our blood vessels and blood cells from oxidative damage. The total polyphenol content (TPC) of leeks averages about 33 milligrams of gallic acid equivalents (GAE) per 100 grams of fresh edible portion (FEP). By contrast, the TPC of red bell peppers averages 27 milligrams; cherry tomatoes, 24 milligrams; and carrots, 10 milligrams. So even though leeks are less concentrated than some of their fellow allium vegetables in terms of total polyphenols (garlic provides about 59 milligrams GAE/100g FEP, and onions provide about 76 milligrams), they are still a highly valuable food in terms of these phytonutrient antioxidants and provide us with important cardiovascular benefits for this reason.

Other Health Benefits

Unfortunately, leeks have received less research attention than their fellow allium vegetables (especially garlic and onions), and for this reason, there is less documentation of their likely health benefits. Given their substantial polyphenol content, including their notable amounts of kaempferol, we would expect to see overlap with garlic and onions in terms of support for many health problems related to oxidative stress and chronic low-level inflammation. These health problems would include atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, and allergic airway inflammation. We would also expect to see leeks providing measurable amounts of protection against several different types of cancer, mostly likely including colorectal cancer. It’s important to remember that even in the absence of research studies to confirm health benefits, leeks still belong to the same allium vegetable family as onions and garlic and contain many health-supportive substances that are similar to (or identical with) the substances in their fellow allium vegetables.

With a more delicate and sweeter flavor than onions, leeks add a subtle touch to recipes without overpowering the other flavors that are present. Although leeks are available throughout the year they are in season from the fall through the early part of spring when they are at their best.

How to Select and Store

Leeks should be firm and straight with dark green leaves and white necks. Good quality leeks will not be yellowed or wilted, nor have bulbs that have cracks or bruises. Since overly large leeks are generally more fibrous in texture, only purchase those that have a diameter of one and one-half inches or less. Try to purchase leeks that are of similar size so as to ensure more consistent cooking if you are planning on cooking the leeks whole. Leeks are available throughout the year, although they are in greater supply from the fall through the early part of spring.

Fresh leeks should be stored unwashed and untrimmed in the refrigerator, where they will keep fresh for between one and two weeks. Wrapping them loosely in a plastic bag will help them to retain moisture. Cooked leeks are highly perishable, and even when kept in the refrigerator, will only stay fresh for about two days. Leeks may be frozen after being blanched for two to three minutes, although they will lose some of their desirable taste and texture qualities. Leeks will keep in the freezer for about three months.

Tips for Preparing Leeks

Cut off green tops of leeks and remove outer tough leaves. Cut off root and cut leeks in half lengthwise. Fan out the leeks and rinse well under running water, leaving them intact. Cut leeks into 2-inch lengths. Holding the leek sections cut side up, cut lengthwise so that you end up with thin strips, known as the chiffonade cut, slicing until you reach the green portion. Make sure slices are cut very thin to shorten cooking time. Let leeks sit for at least 5 minutes before cooking.

Healthiest Way of Cooking Leeks

Heat 3 tablespoons of broth in 10-12 inch stainless steel skillet until it begins to steam. Add 1 pound of cut leeks. Cover and Healthy Sauté for 4 minutes. Add 2 more tablespoons of broth, reduce heat to medium low, and Healthy Sauté for 3 more minutes uncovered while stirring frequently. Toss with 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil, 1 teaspoon of lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste.

To read more about leeks check out http://www.whfoods.com/ This is where I found all the information in this post.

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Morning everyone! This is a really good recipe that my husband and I tried last night. I don’t have alot of pictures from it because I let my husband do the cooking last night. They turned out great and I can not wait for the leftovers tonight! This was a random Pinterest find 🙂

Paleo Pork Chops With Caramelized Onion and Apple Sauce

Ingredients

4 pork chops with the bone in
Salt and pepper to taste
4 tablespoons coconut oil
1 large sweet onion, sliced
5 apples, cored and sliced
3 tablespoons natural organic honey
1 cup sodium free chicken broth

Instructions

1. Sprinkle pork chops on both sides with salt and pepper to season, Slice Onions into skinny rings, skin apples and slice apples. Set Onions and Apples to the side for now.

2. Heat 2 tablespoons of coconut oil in a frying pan over medium heat.

3. Cook pork chops in coconut oil and cook for 5 minutes on every side until brown.

4. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut oil.

5. Stir in the onion, apple slices and honey.

6. Cook until the onions have caramelized and the apples turn soft. Stir in broth.
Pour the apple and onion mixture over the pork chops as topping.

We had Asparagus as our side and it paired perfectly!

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Morning all amazinggg my blog followers!:) Hope y’all are having a great week! With the weekend looming in the very neer future I have to start my meal planing and grocery list for my once a week trip. One thing I’m determined to get on top of before I go is yogurt! Its soo weird normally I’m very into knowing what everything is I buy, whats in it, health benefits or even if it’s just down right not healthy. Yogurt is one thing I have not really researched. I think it’s because I’ve never really liked it but I know its something I should try to eat everyday. It’s normally my afternoon snack. Now my question is what one’s are really good for you and which ones are not? Yesterday my husband noticed that the one I was eating had artificial sweetener in it. It was a pretty major “Fail” moment for me. I try not to eat any artificial sweetener. It was one of the last things on the ingredients list so it didn’t have allot but still its prompted me to research this topic! SOO on to what I found!

The Dirt on Yogurt

Yogurt can be a low-cal way to get protein and calcium, but choose the wrong kind, and you could eat a container with nutritional content similar to that of ice cream.

Pick low-fat varieties, with at least 6 grams of protein. Greek yogurt have more protein per serving than plain yogurt, but full-fat Greek yogurt can contain up to 18 grams of saturated fat.

Also check for sugar. “Oftentimes sugar is off the charts in yogurt,” Gans says. Aim for less than 20 grams of sugar per serving. Choose a version that has lower sugar, between 6 and 12 grams, like plain yogurt, then add your own sweet fruits.

The good news is yogurt is low in sodium.

Greek Yogurt Vs. Regular Yogurt: Which Is More Healthful?

First, to be clear: Both Greek and regular yogurt, in their plain, nonfat or low-fat forms, can be part of a healthful diet. They’re low in calories and packed with calcium and live bacterial cultures. But our Mediterranean friend—which is strained extensively to remove much of the liquid whey, lactose, and sugar, giving it its thick consistency—does have an undeniable edge. In roughly the same amount of calories, it can pack up to double the protein, while cutting sugar content by half. Those are “two things dietitians love,” says Dawn Jackson Blatner, a registered dietitian and author of The Flexitarian Diet. “For someone who wants the creamier texture, a little bit of a protein edge, and a sugar decrease, going Greek is definitely not all hype.” And it’s really got a following: In the past five years, Greek yogurt sales nationwide have skyrocketed, likely because it satisfies consumers’ needs for health, convenience, and taste, according to Nielsen, a global marketing and advertising research company.

Protein. Greek yogurt is high in protein, which helps promote fullness. A typical 6-ounce serving contains 15 to 20 grams, the amount in 2 to 3 ounces of lean meat. That makes it particularly appealing to vegetarians, who sometimes struggle to get enough of the nutrient. An identical serving of regular yogurt, on the other hand, provides just 9 grams, meaning you may feel hunger pangs sooner.

Carbohydrates. Going Greek is a smart choice for low-carb dieters. It contains roughly half the carbs as the regular kind—5 to 8 grams per serving compared with 13 to 17. Plus, the straining process removes some of the milk sugar, lactose, making Greek yogurt less likely to upset the lactose-intolerant. Remember, however, that “both types of yogurt can contain high amounts of carbs if they’re sweetened with sugar or another sweetening agent,” says Kari Hartel, a Missouri-based registered dietitian. “No matter which type you choose, opt for yogurt with less added sugar.”

Fat. Be wary of Greek yogurt’s fat content. In just 7 ounces, Fage’s full-fat Greek yogurt packs 16 grams of saturated fat—or 80 percent of your total daily allowance if you’re on a 2,000-calorie diet. (That’s more than in three Snickers bars.) Dannon’s regular full-fat yogurt has 5 grams of saturated fat in an 8-ounce serving. Saturated fat raises total and “bad” LDL cholesterol levels, increasing the risk for heart disease. Read nutrition labels carefully. If you’re going Greek, stick to low-fat and fat-free versions.

Sodium. A serving of Greek yogurt averages 50 milligrams of sodium—about half the amount in most brands of the regular kind. (Low-sodium versions of regular yogurt are available.) Too much salt can boost blood pressure and increase the risk of other heart problems. The federal government’s 2010 Dietary Guidelines urge Americans to cap sodium at 2,300 milligrams a day, or 1,500 milligrams if they’re older than 50, African-American, or have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease.

Calcium. Regular yogurt provides 30 percent of the federal government’s recommended daily amount. Greek yogurt loses some of its calcium through the straining process, but still packs a wallop. A 6-ounce cup typically supplies about 20 percent of the daily recommendation. If you’re still worried about calcium intake, load up on milk, seeds, and almonds, says Sarah Krieger, a registered dietician and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association.

Okay so even after that. How do I chose the healthiest one?!? I already had picked a greek yogurt b/c of how much we workout I wanted the extra protein and I still failed. 😦

1. Keep it simpleTo make yogurt, all that’s needed is milk and two live bacterial cultures, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, which turn the milk into yogurt via fermentation. “Beyond that, a few added extras for flavor, like a little sugar or some fruit, are fine,” Kaufman says. Steer clear of products that have long lists of ingredients with things you can’t pronounce or wouldn’t expect to see in yogurt, like hydrogenated oils and artificial sweeteners.-

2. Look for good bugs-Probiotics—good bacteria similar to the ones living in your digestive tract—are yogurt’s key ingredient. These beneficial bugs have been shown to help with digestion and gut health. But surprisingly, not all yogurt sold in stores actually contains “live and active cultures,” as the bacteria in yogurt are known. Some companies heat-treat yogurt after culturing, which kills off bacteria, both good and bad, to make it more shelf-stable and reduce tartness.

3.Make calcium count-Yogurt is a stellar source of bone-building calcium, but the amount can vary from brand to brand. Aim for one that has at least 15 percent of the daily value for calcium; the yogurts on our list contain anywhere from 15 to 35 percent.

4. Do a sugar check-Trying to cut back on added sugar? Don’t rely only on the number of grams listed on the label. Yogurt has a fair amount of naturally occurring milk sugar, aka lactose (about 9 grams in a 6-ounce container of plain regular yogurt, and about 7 grams in Greek yogurt), and the sugar figure includes both natural and added sugars. Our shortcut: Avoid any product that lists sugar as the first or second ingredient.

5. Beware of fake fruit- Adding your own fresh fruit to plain yogurt is always a healthy choice. But sometimes you want the convenience of yogurt with fruit already added. Make sure you see actual fruit on the list of ingredients, ideally before any added sugars, Kaufman advises. “Otherwise it probably just contains a mix of sugar and food coloring or vegetable juice,” she say

6. Read labels carefully- Luckily, it’s easy to tell if your yogurt includes probiotics. The National Yogurt Association has created a Live & Active Cultures seal for products that contain significant amounts of L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus. (These two bacteria, in particular, must be used in order for a product to be called “yogurt,” per federal regulations. You might see additional cultures listed, but the research on their health benefits is still emerging; a yogurt that contains more cultures isn’t necessarily better for you.) Not every company chooses to carry the seal, so you can also look for “Live and Active Cultures” on the label or L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus in the ingredient list. If a product has been heat-treated after culturing, the company is required to say so on the label.

The winners for the top 3??

1. Stonyfield Farm Plain Organic Low Fat Yogurt

2. Plain 0% Fage Greek Yogurt

3. Chobani 0% Yogurt

A couple of the worst?

1. Yoplait Greek Yogurt (Yep that’s the one I was getting)

2. Honey flavor Dannon Greek Yogurt

Question of the day!!!

Do y’all have a favorite yogurt? Which one and why?

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These just came out of the oven have been tasted and husband approved! 🙂 The combination of lemon and blueberry together is amazing! I was skeptical when I first saw this because i’m not crazy about lemon in things that I bake but it complements the blueberry and gives it a fresh light taste. These are perfect to go with your morning coffee!

Ingredients

2 cups all purpose flour
1 ½ tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
1 stick unsalted butter, room temperature
1 packed cup of Light brown sugar
2 eggs
2 cups blueberries (12 oz)
2 tsp lemon zest
½ cup plain Greek low fat yogurt

Directions

1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

2. In a medium sized bowl, whisk together your flour, baking powder and salt. Add the blueberries and lemon zest and toss to combine.

3. Cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the yogurt then the dry ingredients, mixing only until incorporated and being careful not to crush the blueberries.

4. Scoop batter into muffin tin (It made about 18 for me but depends on how full you fill them) I also added some chopped fine walnuts to the top for a little crunch.

5. Bake for 30 Minutes (Again depends how hot your oven runs), Let cool (Or not! I tried mine while they were still warm and they tasted AMAZING!)